No Nonsense Muscle Building 2.0 Review


Vince Delmonte’s new, updated bodybuilding program has arrived. It’s called No Nonsense Muscle Building 2.0: Gene Expression Training to Increase Testosterone, Leanness, and Mass.

Before I go into further details I’d like to start this review by sharing some of the most common mistakes made by trainees who are trying to build muscle (for those who may be new to my blog). I think this will help understand why Vince Delmonte’s program can be extremely helpful to some people:

Muscle Building Mistakes

Mistake #1: Trying to imitate the routines of professional bodybuilders.

It’s not uncommon for guys to naively copy a program they’ve read in a bodybuilding magazine and think it will give them results. This is not advisable for a couple of reasons. First and foremost, the vast majority of bodybuilders use anabolic steroids. These powerful drugs enhance their ability to train and recover–trying to imitate their workouts is likely to result in overtraining. But there’s something else to consider: professional bodybuilders tend to be genetically gifted (even without the drugs). What works for them just may not work for you.

Mistake #2: Spending too much money on supplements.

The bodybuilding supplement industry has been around for decades. They’ve been making pills, powders, and potions that will supposedly help you build muscle, lose fat, and increase athletic performance. The industry has produced a few helpful supplements, like creatine monohydrate, whey protein, fish oil, etc. But there’s a lot of junk out there that’s a complete waste of money. Unfortunately, many naive consumers fall for slick advertising with no scientific backing.

Mistake #3: Inadequate nutrition

A lot of guys put work in the gym but don’t put any real effort into planning their meals/nutrition. You can make some gains without eating well, but why not get the most out of the effort you put into training? Learn to eat properly and you’ll be able to reach your natural genetic potential in terms of building muscle and losing fat.

The mistakes are some of the reasons that beginners get frustrated with their results in the gym. You can avoid these errors by following a well-designed plan for transforming your body. With this in mind, let me explain what you’ll get if you decide to invest in No Nonsense Muscle Building 2.0.

No Nonsense Muscle Building 2.0: Program


Gene Expression Training: Muscle Fiber Switch Trick Guide

This book introduces some of the overall training philosophy behind this program.  I’ll give you a little summary:

Human skeletal muscle is composed of two basic fiber types: slow twitch (type 1) and fast twitch (type 2).  Type 1 fibers are associated with endurance while type 2 are associated with strength and speed.  We are born with a certain percentage of each–it is genetically predetermined.  We can’t change our genetics, but we can adjust our training to be more customized to our muscle fiber composition (by manipulating the rep range, etc.).  Delmonte explains this in more detail in the manual.

Quick-Start Guide

This simply guides you on what you’ll need to get started. You can check it out before you dive into the other components.

Training Guide and 18-Week Training Program with Printable Workout Sheets


These guides will show you exactly what workouts you should do for over four months. The beginning phase emphasizes building muscle mass. The second phase switches over to strength, and the final phase helps you to lower your body fat to finish off the process.  The progression here makes sense: generally speaking, bigger muscles will have more strength potential.  You can work on getting lean after you’ve built some size and strength.

The program will introduce you to effective training techniques that will make working out both interesting, challenging and efficient (more muscle in less time).

Here’s what’s really interesting about the training component of No Nonsense Muscle Building 2.0: There are three separate training guides you can follow according to your specific muscle fiber composition. This helps you get the best results according to your specific training needs.

Nutrition Guide

As I’ve mentioned before, you’ll never get the results you desire without proper nutrition. This book will show you how to plan your meals in order to achieve optimal results. You can customize the meals for your own specific needs/goals (fat loss, building muscle, etc).  Study this thoroughly–it can make or break you as far as your gains go.

Supplement Guide

As the name implies, this component is about supplements. The information is good, but I’d advise you to simply stick to the basics (creatine monohydrate, whey protein, a multivitamin, and fish oil). As long as you stick to these basics and reputable brands you’ll be fine–there’s no need to buy the specific brands mentioned in this guide.

Muscle Mechanics: The Ultimate Exercise Execution Guide to Maximum Growth, Tension, and Longevity.

This is something that Vince spent over a year researching and writing. There’s some really valuable information about lifting technique that you may not find anywhere else (not without spending a great deal of time studying).

Secrets of Success

This is more of a general work about succeeding both inside and outside of the gym. I think this would be especially helpful for younger readers–you’ll learn how to achieve your goals and be more successful in life. This is a nice addition to the program.

Additional Products (“Upsells”)

These are some additional components you can buy with this program. They are optional: you do not have to order them to get the basic muscle-building program. But you may choose to spend a little more if you think some of these will help you reach your goals.  As I’ve said before, solid training information is always a wise investment:

1. The Ultimate Nutrition Bundle: Additional guides to help you with your diet. There are two options available–the more expensive one includes cooking videos.

2. The Genetic Maximizer Jumbo Bundle: This is the most expensive upgrade, but it includes a lot of useful content.

3. Supplement Offer: To be honest, I’m not sure I’d spend any extra money on supplements or anything related to them. Like I said, it’s best to stick to the basics.

Program Review

Vince Delmonte’s Transformation

It’s been over ten years since Vince Delmonte introduced No Nonsense Muscle Building: Skinny Guy Secrets to Insane Muscle Gain. His success has brought more than his fair share of haters, but my interactions with him have been very positive. He’s help thousands of guys build muscle through well-designed training programs.

No Nonsense Muscle Building 2.0 is a fantastic upgrade that reflects the years he has put into being a student of nutrition and training. I really wish programs like this had been available when I started working out decades ago. I would have much rather invested in this kind of knowledge instead of blowing so much money on supplements and wasting time on trial-and-error methods.

Here are the types of people that I think would find this program beneficial:

*Beginners–guys who are just starting and want to learn how to build their foundation of size and strength. I think this is an excellent resource for learning how to build your first 20-25 lb. of muscle.

*Intermediate trainees–guys who have spent some time in the gym but have never followed a program specifically designed for those who are genetically typical and natural (not using steroids).

*Those who are eager to learn. Based on my observation, a lot of guys start working out with very little idea of what they are doing in terms of exercise selection, number of reps, proper form, etc. It is unfortunate because this can lead to a lot of wasted effort.

*Returning trainees–those who have been out of the gym for a few months/years and need to start over. You may find that you have better results by following this program instead of whatever you were doing before.

If this sounds like you then I think you would benefit from No Nonsense Muscle Building 2.0.

Just CLICK HERE if you’d like to order this program at a special discount (limited time offer).

Alternative Program: If you are a more advanced/experienced trainee I’d recommend Ben Pakulski’s MI40X.  This program has been one of my best sellers for those looking for an advanced bodybuilding approach.

40 Strong Review


I’ve had the chance to look over a new program from the folks at Critical Bench called 40 Strong.  This one is of special interest to me since I am now over 40 years old (I hit the big 4-0 a few years ago).  Here’s my review:


Let’s face it, a lot of guys in their 40’s (and older) are completely out of shape.  This can happen for several reasons:

*Other things take priority over planning exercise and training.

*The aging process is accelerated by bad habits (an unhealthy lifestyles).

*Testosterone levels can plummet if the natural decline is further accelerated by obesity, poor diet, etc.

*The “mid-life crisis”–men feel like their life is not where it should be.

You get the idea.  Needless to say, a workout/diet program cannot solve all of these issues.  But it may be a starting point for those who want to improve their fitness level and overall quality of life.  And a well-designed program can also help those who have been consistently training but want to mix things up a little in light of new priorities and goals.

The Program

This is where 40 Strong comes in.  The authors have designed it to be something that can be incorporated into the “typical” life of a man with a career, family, and all the other responsibilities that life brings.  I’ll give you a little information on the training and nutrition philosophy behind this program:

Nutrition:  I’ve noticed that as I get older I’m a lot more sensitive to the foods I eat.  In other words, I can quickly feel the difference between a few days of eating healthy food vs a day or two of junk.  The nutrition parameter gives you some general guidance for choosing healthy foods.

Training:  The exercise component of 40 Strong is designed with more mature trainees in mind.  It incorporates cardiovascular training (steady-state cardio as well as circuit type training), stretching/mobility, and strength/hypertrophy training.   One nice thing is the exercise descriptions link directly to a YouTube video–you can watch and see exercise (or exercises) demonstrated.  The workouts get longer and/or more intense as you progress through eight weeks.


Let me give you some ideas on the type of man that 40 Strong would be most beneficial for:

*Men in their 40’s who have neglected their health and want to start getting back into shape (losing fat, building muscle, becoming more flexible, etc).

*Older/experienced trainees who simply need a change of routine.  Guys who have been weight training for years, for example, may need to spend some time on cardiovascular training an mobility.

*Men who need to focus on diet and fat loss while maintaining their muscle/strength.  I see a lot of older guys who train but are just too fat.  They would look (and probably feel) better if they focused some of their efforts on getting leaner.

If this sounds like you I think you could benefit from this program.  You could spend 8 weeks on it then move on to something that is a little more advanced or specialized.

Just CLICK HERE if you’re interested in trying 40 Strong. 

Weightlifting Belts: A Guide to Choosing and Using


One of the first pieces of equipment a trainee will want to consider is a weightlifting belt.  I recently bought a new one (more on that later), so I thought this would be a good time to write about this topic.

The “Weaken Your Abs” Myth:

Some believe wearing a belt weakens your abdominal muscles.  This is not true–a belt gives your abs something to push against, so they are very much involved in a belted lift.  I would, however, advise you to only wear a belt during: squats, deadlifts, and military/overhead press.  Putting one on as soon as you walk in the gym is counterproductive.

Let me add something else here: I would also advise you to train “beltless” for your first few months.  Just work on your form and start building your foundation before using any equipment.  After that you may want to consider using one (more on how to use it later).

Why Use a Belt?

As I’ve mentioned, wearing a weightlifting belt while training gives your abs something to push against, which raises your intra-abdominal pressure during the lift.  This increased pressure adds stiffness to your trunk and gives you more stability.1 There’s also some evidence to suggest a belt can reduce compression on your spine when used properly (when you inhale in order to push your abs against it).2

Here’s the bottom line: most people find they can lift more with a belt than without.  All things being equal, pushing or pulling more weight will accelerate your gains in size and strength.

There are two more benefits I’ll mention before moving on:

Awareness:  having a belt on may help you be more aware of your posture and body positioning while training.  This is kind of hard to explain, but you’ll know what I’m talking about when you experience it–you simply have a better “feel” for your stance, position, etc.

Back Warmth: I like to wear a lose belt even during my warm-up sets for the squat and deadlift.  It helps get my back warmed up (and keeps it that way).

Types of Belts and Buckles


Not the style I recommend.

Start training in a typical gym and chances are you’ll see a belt that looks something like this: wide in the back and narrow in the front.  This is a very common style, but it’s not what I would recommend if you are wanting to get the maximum benefit.  I would encourage you to invest your money in a powerlifting style belt–one that is a uniform 4-inch width all the way around (you’ll see pictures of this style below).  Remember something I said earlier: a belt gives your abs something to push against.  A powerlifting belt is perfect for this purpose.


You’ll see two thicknesses available if you start shopping around: 13 mm and 10 mm.  The thicker (13 mm) belts are going to be stiffer and take longer to break in.  Most lifters (including yours truly) go with the thinner 10 mm belts–13 mm is overkill for the needs of most trainees.


Now let’s talk about the most commonly available types of buckles: lever, single prong, and double prong.

Lever Belts

Lever Belt
Lever Belt

Pictured here is the first powerlifting belt I ever owned, and as you can see, it a lever belt. I bought this one almost twenty years ago and it’s still holding up nicely (the site I bought it from no longer exists).

The biggest advantage of a lever belt is the quickness with which you can tighten and loosen it.  One quick motion and you’re either ready to lift or ready to rest after your set.

The biggest disadvantage of a lever belt is the fact that you need a screwdriver to adjust it.  This may not be a big deal, but it’s something to consider.

One more thing: I’ve heard people expressing concern over the lever breaking (due to metal fatigue, etc.), but I’ve never had this problem. You could always buy a replacement if this happened.

Single-Prong Belts

Single Prong Belt
Single Prong Belt

I recently ordered this single prong belt from, and so far I’m really happy with it.

The advantage of a single-prong buckle is the relative ease with which you can adjust the waist size.  Right now, for example, I’m at my “winter weight”–about ten pounds heavier than I usually am during warmer months.  I can just pull the belt a little tighter as I get leaner.

There may be times that you need to adjust the belt tightness more frequently than seasonal weight differences.  You may, for example, want to experiment with what feels right for a particular lift or even a particular day.  This is what I’m enjoying about a single prong belt.

Needless to say, the disadvantage of a prong belt is that it’s a little more difficult to tighten or loosen it (compared to a lever belt).  But so far this hasn’t been a big deal at all for me.

Double-Prong Belts

Two prongs theoretically increase stability and add to the life of the belt (since the stress is distributed over two holes).  But the extra prong makes these belts more difficult to use/adjust, and I doubt it it is worth the extra hassle for most trainees.  But if you if you just have to look like “the Wolverine” when you train . . .


Using a Belt

As I mentioned earlier, I would recommend you only use a belt for lifts that put compression of the spine: squats (including front squats), deadlifts, and overhead/military press.

How heavy should you go before putting it on?  There’s no hard-and-fast rule for this, and you can experiment and see what works for you.  I usually put mine on loosely even for warm-up and lighter sets on the before-mentioned exercises.  This doesn’t give any real support, but it does help get my back warmed up.  I wait and tighten it up for heavier sets.  As a general rule, for example, I tighten up my belt when squatting over 300 lb (maybe a little heavier for deadlift).

The tightness and positioning of your belt is something you’ll also need to experiment with.  I’d recommend you tighten your belt snugly, but not so much that you can’t inhale and brace hard against it with your abs.   I tend to wear mine a little lower on my waist for squats and a little higher for deadlifts (a subtle difference, but one I can feel when training).

Final Thoughts:

A solid powerlifting belt is a great investment.  It will help you lift heavier weights and should last for years (if not decades).  Hopeful this article has helped those who are thinking about buying and using one.


1. Clin Biomech (Bristol, Avon). 1999 Feb;14(2):79-87. Effects of abdominal belts on intraabdominal pressure, intra-muscular pressure in the erector spinae muscles and myoelectrical activities of trunk muscles.

2. Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2006 Oct 15;31(22):E833-9. Effect of a stiff lifting belt on spine compression during lifting.